Monday, April 14, 2014

Releasing This Week! Transcendence, Boderlands 2: Volume 2, and more Frozen

As we are fast moving into the Spring/Summer season of big-time, movies and video games, the soundtrack releases are heating up as well.  Here's a list of some soundtracks you might be interested in picking up on Tuesday, April 15, 2014.

Friday, April 11, 2014

SoundCast Ep. 73 - Captain America: The Winter Soldier

SoundCast Ep. 73 - Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Ep. 73 - Captain America:  The Winter Soldier

Cap is Back! And he's got a little help with his friends and frienemies: Black Widow, Falcon, Nick Fury and The Winter Soldier. Justin Craig (Foxnews.com) and Kristen Romanelli (Film Score Monthly) join Christopher Coleman to not only discuss the the film, CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER, but it's original score by Henry Jackman.


Episode Highlights

00:00 - Captain America: The Winter Avenger
02:28 - WHYBLT? Atlantis: The Last Continent by Russel Garcia
04:34 - WHYBLT? The Othello Symphony by Elliot Goldenthal
11:23 - WHYBLT? Studio Ghibli Classics by Joe Hisaishi
21:30 - The Winter Soldier - general movie reaction
39:31 - The Winter Soldier - movie spoiler talk
67:20 - The Winter Soldier - soundtrack discussion

Music Selections

00:00 - "Star Spangled Man" (Captain America: The First Avenger) by Alan Silvestri
00:00 - "The Causeway" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
03:08 - "Main Title" (Atlantis The Last Continent) by Russel Garcia
04:42 - "Movement 1" (The Othello Symphony) by Elliot Goldenthal
11:29 - "Porco E Bella" (Porco Rosso) by Joe Hisaishi
21:04 - "Taking a Stand" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
38:58 - "Countdown" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
66:11 - "Into the Fray" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
68:09 - "We Did It" (Captain America: The First Avenger) by Alan Silvestri
73:16 - "The Smithsonian" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
74:40 - "End of the Line" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
86:50 - "The Winter Soldier" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
88:25 - "Why So Serious?" (The Dark Knight) by Hans Zimmer, James Newton Howard
89:52 - "The Causeway" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
92:51 - "Taking a Stand" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
93:26 - "The Causeway" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
101:21 - "First Class" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman
108:11 - "Project Insight" (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) by Henry Jackman

Notes:

Follow Kristen Romanelli on Twitter - @kbfornow

Follow Justin Craig on Twitter - @justin_m_craig

Support Tracksounds:

Most of the  soundtracks mentioned in this episode can be found at Amazon.  Your purchases through these links help us to keep on keepin' on!  Thank You!

Buy Soundtracks at Amazon.com




Sunday, April 06, 2014

Rio 2 (Soundtrack) by John Powell

Rio 2 (Soundtrack) by John Powell


Rio ... Grande!
Review by Richard Buxton

Despite making a large dent in the box-office and receiving a generally warm critical response, 2011’s RIO was a largely forgettable and formulaic production that did little to stand out from the many anthropomorphic animal adventures that queue up for release each year. Its failings were hardly unique and were not quite enough to derail the film to the point of it being unenjoyable, but there was still a sense that RIO was just another run-of-the-mill animated stop-gap before the year’s bigger releases, and it was a feeling that coursed through the entire film. Despite emphasis on the film’s exotic Brazilian setting, RIO could have taken place just about anywhere and had similar results. There was a lack of conviction behind the film’s Latin American setting, and at times this extended even as far as JOHN POWELL’S score. That’s not to say that POWELL’S score was not at times excellent, but on the whole it failed to fully ignite in the way many have come to expect his works to. If his score for RIO 2 is anything to go by, the film’s geographical focus has increased significantly.

Unwrapping: Studio Ghibli Classics from Wasabi Records




Wasabi Records has released at least seven of Joe Hisiashi's original scores for his works with Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli.  We "unwrap" seven at once and give you a peek at the beautiful design put into these releases.  As of April 5, 2014, these titles retail only in Europe.

The music is from each title is property of Wasabi Records and no copyright infringement is intended but offered for informational purposes only.

Tracks used:

00:00 - "Opening Theme" - Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
04:52 - "Carrying You" - Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
07:06 - "The Girl Who Fell from the Sky" - Castle in the Sky
08:12 - "The Village in May" - My Neighbor Totoro
09:36 - "On a Clear Day" - Kiki's Delivery Service
10:23 - "Porco E Bella" - Porco Rosso
11:40 - "Journey to the West" - Princess Mononoke
12:59 - "Princess Mononoke Theme - Vocal" - Princess Mononoke
14:25 - "One Summer's Day" - Spirited Away
16:31 - "The Return" - Spirited Away


PURCHASE OPTIONS - Amazon.it

Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind - http://amzn.to/PFyeb1
Laputa: Castle in the Sky - http://amzn.to/1q5vhvy
My Neighbor Totoro -  http://amzn.to/1qcuqeC
Kiki's Delivery Service - http://amzn.to/1lAEADF
Porco Rosso - http://amzn.to/1oBO1Yj
Princess Mononoke - http://amzn.to/1jhIBw0
Spirited Away - http://amzn.to/1mMQHNZ


Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Top 10 Metal Gear Solid Tracks

Top 10 Metal Gear Solid Tracks

Top 10 Metal Gear Solid Tracks
by Richard Buxton

Hideo Kojima’s ‘Metal Gear Solid’ franchise is undoubtedly one of the most influential to ever hit gaming consoles. The legendary Solid Snake was infiltrating the lairs of supervillains long before the stealth action game was even recognised as a genre by the mainstream, and with the 1998 release of Metal Gear Solid on the Playstation, Kojima had changed the landscape of the action game forever. Combining state-of-the-art visuals and cutscenes, larger than life characters with the voice acting to match, intensely rewarding gameplay, and outstanding cinematic music, each Metal Gear Solid release has pushed the boundaries of what was thought possible.

With the recent release of ‘Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes’ and the launch of ‘The Phantom Pain’ slowly creeping ever closer, I’ve compiled a list of my top 10 tracks from my favourite series in gaming: Metal Gear Solid.

10. Debriefing by Harry Gregson-Williams (Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater)

For such an eccentric video game franchise, Metal Gear is as effective as any at bringing an emotional hammer down upon the player, and no moment in the franchise managed this as effectively Snake Eater’s bittersweet conclusion. Harry Gregson-Williams’ mournful hymn captures the moment beautifully in three distinct but equally anguished sequences that rank among the most touching of the series, going so far as to draw audible tears of anguish from the normally so robust and inspiring main theme.

Debriefing by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark

9. Battle in the Jungle by Norihiko Hibino (Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater)

The industrial setting of the previous Metal Gear Solids was often reflected in the intensely rigid ‘alert mode’ music, so it comes as no surprise that Snake Eater’s jungle-based alert theme has a noticeably more flexible and expressive personality. Ethnic woodwinds reflect the jungle setting as chugging guitars and synth-bass get the heart racing. Snake Eater’s jungle-based alert theme comes in a collection of forms, and is discovered at its most thrilling in the fan compiled soundtrack ‘Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Byte’.

Battle in the Jungle (Game and Original Mix) [Snake Eater] by 日比野則彦 on Grooveshark

8. Sins of the Father composed by Akihiro Honda, performed by Donna Burke (Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain)

Despite the game still being some way off release, the use of “Sins of the Father” in the E3 2013 ‘Phantom Pain’ trailer was enough to secure it a place in the lower half of this top 10. A heart-rending opening leads into an electric fusion of synthetic and orchestral elements courtesy of Akihiro Honda that is completed by an enormous vocal performance by Donna Burke.

Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima is keenly aware of his games’ reputation for the hyperbolic, and has used this spectacular song as yet another opportunity to push the series further into the outlandish. We wouldn’t have it any other way.

Sins Of The Father by Donna Burke on Grooveshark

7. Mobs Alive by Harry Gregson-Williams (Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots)

As the musical backdrop to a massacre, “Mobs Alive” is an electrifying ascent into an orgy of nanomachine-fueled violence. Electronics propel and strings churn as Liquid Ocelot’s Haven Troopers slaughter helpless Marines in a “violent ceasefire”, the haunting choir condemning them to a bloody death. MGS4 isn’t short on intense musical sequences, and this track stands out thanks in part to its inclusion in the game’s hype-injecting E3 2007 trailer.

Mobs Alive by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark

6. Opening Infiltration by Harry Gregson-Williams (Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty)

MGS2’s opening was a seminal moment for video games. Not only did it give the world a glimpse at what the PS2 was really capable of - given that the game was, at the time, arguably the most visually impressive title available on the platform - it was the beginning of a game at the heart of the gaming industry’s cinematic revolution. As games steered further towards the realm of film, Kojima’s franchise continued to pioneer cinematic storytelling in video games. Kojima’s visual and narrative intent was abundantly clear. All the game needed was a score to match, and Harry Gregson-Williams’ haunting choral cries and rising brass launched Snake’s leap of faith in stunning fashion. This was the eagerly anticipated return of a legend, and a moment in which the potential of cinematic storytelling within a video game was truly realised.

Opening Infiltration by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark

5. Virtuous Mission by Harry Gregson-Williams (Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater)

MGS3’s opening cue is perhaps the perfect musical portrayal of the world’s restless wait for the release of the long-awaited game. A slow-burn of intrigue and suspense creeps teasingly upwards until the fuse is lit and hype reaches terminal velocity as the player and Snake are sent mercifully into freefall, soaring into… another cutscene. Despite the sudden segue into yet more exposition, “Virtuous Mission” captures Snake Eater’s introduction in breathtaking fashion, and follows the trend of music playing a large part in each game’s opening infiltration sequences.

Virtuous Mission by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark

4. Encounter by KCE Japan Sound Team (Metal Gear Solid)

Aside from the main theme, this nerve-shredding “alert mode” cue is perhaps the most iconic of the Metal Gear franchise, and in hindsight foreshadowed the arrival of Media Ventures/Remote Control Productions composer Harry Gregson-Williams with its at times striking similarity to fellow MV/RCP composer Mark Mancina’s ‘Speed’ score (as shown in this comparison video). Memories of Snake frantically seeking cover come flooding back in waves of frenetic percussion and hair-raising synths in a cue that will remain eternally etched into the memories of all those who infiltrated the depths of the legendary Shadow Moses nuclear facility. It’s almost as effectively panic-inducing as the dreaded and nightmarish tune to Sonic’s watery death.

Encounter by Konami on Grooveshark

3. Calling to the Night composed by Akihiro Honda, performed by Natasha Farrow (Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops)

Often overlooked in favor of songs heard in the series’ major entries, “Calling to the Night” is a powerful reflection of Big Boss’s ethical evolution during the events of ‘Portable Ops’, and is performed with real gravitas and a classic flair by Natasha Farrow. The grand orchestral eruption into the song’s chorus echoes Metal Gear’s unbroken passion and revered extravagance effortlessly in a song that is arguably the franchise’s most vocally, lyrically, and compositionally compelling.

Calling To The Night by Natasha Farrow on Grooveshark

2. “Metal Gear Solid” Main Theme [Metal Gear Solid 3 Version] by Harry Gregson-Williams and Tappi Iwase (Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater)

Debuting in the E3 2003 trailer, MGS3’s main theme began with what has now become the main Metal Gear Solid theme, and ended with an extended and exotically-tinged rendition of the original Tappi Iwase theme. Kojima has always been known for his grandiose trailers, and Harry Gregson-Williams’ musical accompaniment did not disappoint with it’s new theme and its hectically percussive middle section that only ratcheted up the hype for a game already soaring at fever pitch.

"METAL GEAR SOLID" Main Theme (METAL GEAR SOLID 3 Version) by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark

1. Metal Gear Solid 2 Main Theme by Harry Gregson-Williams and Tappi Iwase (Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty)

The No.1 spot was always going to be taken by the iconic theme, the only question was which variation would win out. This version of the celebrated theme was one of the first impressions of Harry Gregson-Williams’ highly anticipated score given its inclusion at the climax of the 2000 E3 trailer. It would again be heard during the game’s opening credits sequence, a sequence that preceded one of the most hyped games in history. Treating listeners to an opening action variation before the theme’s militaristic pinnacle ends it spectacularly, the “MGS2 Main Theme” is as exciting as it is inspiring, and ultimately edges out the MGS3 theme with greater conviction in its rendition of the main theme. It’s undoubtedly a source of limitless nostalgia for many gamers, a nostalgia all the more poignant given the fact that a new interpretation never be heard again as a result of unfortunate plagiarism issues concerning the theme, its original composer Tappi Iwase, and Russian composer Georgy Sviridov. In the end, no matter where the inspiration came from, this theme stands among the most memorable the video game industry has to offer.

Metal Gear Solid Main Theme by Harry Gregson-Williams on Grooveshark


So have we missed one of your favorite tracks from this immense franchise?  Let us know!

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Behind The Score - Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 by Oscar Araujo

Behind The Score - Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 by Oscar Araujo

MUSIC OF SHADOW

Castlevania - one of the video game industry's most enduring and iconic franchises.  Born long before the days of super-powered PCs and consoles, Konami debuted the original Castlevania video game in 1986.  Since, the franchise has gone on to see some forty titles released across multiple platforms.  Castlevania now entails a rich history and detailed timeline which chronicles the conflict between the vampire-hunting, Belmont family and Dracula and his resurrection every one-hundred years.  The music composed for the very first game came from Satoe Terashima and Kinuyo Yamashita.  They were later followed in the franchise by composers such as Kenichi Matsubara and Jun Funahashi.  While the games have gone on to spur feature film talk since 2005, their scores have spawned multiple remixes and even inclusion in some of the live, video game music performances, which are ever growing more popular and more frequent.

In 2010, CASTLEVANIA: LORDS OF SHADOW was released by Konami - rebooting the series and breaking from the extensive, pre-existing history.  LORDS OF SHADOW, MIRROR OF FATE, and ultimately LORDS OF SHADOW 2 would go on to catapult the series setting forward by a millennium, from 1046 to 2014 AD.   The composer that the Konami producers chose to handle this radical change musically was OSCAR ARAUJO, whose original score for 2010's LORDS OF SHADOW became one of the year's best reviewed video game scores.  In 2013, the franchise returned with MIRROR OF FATE and again in 2014 with LORDS OF SHADOW 2 both with Araujo as the game score's composer.

Tracksounds is proud to bring you this special, behind-the-score-feature which, in addition to our original review of LORDS OF SHADOW, offers three, brand new reviews and an interview with composer OSCAR ARAUJO in both English and Spanish:


Video: Behind The Scenes: Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2

Interview: Oscar Araujo | Espanol

Review:  Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 by Oscar Araujo

Review:  Castlevania: Lords of Shadow - Mirror of Fate by Oscar Araujo

Review:  Castlevania: Lords of Shadow  by Oscar Araujo (Ultimate Edition)

Review:  Castlevania: Lords of Shadow by Oscar Araujo


Sunday, March 09, 2014

SoundCast Episode 72 - The 2013 Cue Awards Show


Episode 72 - The 2013 Cue Awards Show

The Tracksounds team unveil the winners of this year's awards!  In addition, the winners of the Genius Choice Vote (votes cast by Soundcast listeners and Tracksounds visitors) are also revealed!  Once again Marius Masalar gives his special award, The Marius, recognizing excellence in composition in the Indie-video-game world and Richard Buxton awards "The Monkey King Award" to the outstanding composer of the year from the Far East.   Celebrate some of 2013's best in soundtracks with the Tracksounds team and with special composer guests from around the world to accept their awards!


Episode Highlights

00:00 - Welcome to the 2013 Cue Awards
02:36 - How The Cue Awards Work (Edmund Meinerts)
04:12 - "Cue The Orchestra" by Marius Masalar available at Bandcamp
06:11 - Cue Award Winner - Record Label of the Year
16:00 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Record Label of the Year
16:25 - Cue Award Winner - Surprise of the Year
22:01 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Surprise of the Year
25:20 - Cue Award Winner - Best Cue
30:40 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Cue
32:15 - What is the Genius Choice Vote (Marius Masalar)
32:54 - Cue Award Winner - Best Dramatic Score
37:57 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Dramatic Score
41:10 - Cue Award Winner - Best Action Score
46:43 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Action Score
52:29 - Cue Award Winner - Best Animated Score
59:44 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Animated Score
61:49 - The Monkey King Award (Richard Buxton)
64:52 - Cue Award Winner - Breakout Composer of the Year
73:33 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Breakout Composer of the Year
77:20 - Cue Award Winner - Best Sci-fi/Fantasy Score
81:34 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Sci-fi/Fantasy Score
81:57 - Cue Award Winner - Best Television Score
87:33 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Television Score
93:30 - The Marius Award (Marius Masalar)
96:32 - Cue Award Winner - Best Video Game Score
102:52 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Video Game Score
110:59 - Cue Award Winner - Best Overall Score
120:09 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Best Overall Score
128:16 - Cue Award Winner - Composer of the Year
131:50 - Genius Choice Vote Winner - Composer of the Year
135:59 - Our final thoughts
142:48 - End Credits and Thank You

Music Selections

00:00 - "Cue the Orchestra (2013)" (The Cue Awards) by Marius Masalar
16:50 - "Nilin The Memory Hunter" (Remember Me) by Olivier Deriviere
19:19 - "Nilin The Memory Hunter" (Remember Me) by Olivier Deriviere
22:09 - "Ciary's Theme" (Mortal Instruments: City of Bones) by Atli Ovarsson
30:45 - "The Forest River" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
33:20 - "Forbidden Love" (Romeo & Juliet) by Abel Korzeniowski
38:03 - "Buchanan Mansion And Daisy Suite" (The Great Gatsby) by Craig Armstrong
42:27 - "Now You See Me" (Now You See Me) by Brian Tyler
47:04 - "Iron Man 3" (Iron Man 3) by Brian Tyler
52:48 - "Planes" (Planes) by Mark Mancina
59:54 - "Elsa and Anna" (Frozen) by Christophe Beck
62:39 - "2013 Joe Hisaishi Suite" (compiled by Richard Buxton) by Joe Hisaishi
65:09 - "Shenzou" (Gravity) by Steven Price
73:45 - "Aletheia's Last Vision" (God of War: Ascension) by Tyler Bates
77:46 - "The Forest River" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
79:44 - "Smaug (Extended)" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
82:27 - "Laval the Lion" (Legends of Chima) by Anthony Lledo
87:40 - "Market Day" (Doctor Who: Series 7) by Murray Gold
94:07 - "Go at Thy Fate" (Desktop Dungeons) by Grant Kirkhope
97:00 - "Chase Through Montmartre" (Remember Me) by Olivier Deriviere
103:07 - "Main Theme" (Assassin's Creed IV Black Flag) by Brian Tyler
111:31 - "My Armor Is Iron" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
114:17 - "Smaug (Extended)" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
115:40 - "Beyond the Forest" (Hobbit/ Smaug) by Howard Shore
120:19 - "They Are Everywhere" (Doctor Who: Series 7) by Murray Gold
128:34 - "Thor The Dark World" (Thor The Dark World) by Brian Tyler
135:15 - "Marvel Studios Fanfare" (Thor The Dark World) by Brian Tyler


Notes:

The 2013 Joe Hisaishi Suite is comprised of:
"The Falcon" (The Wind Rises)
"Flight" (The Tale of Princess Kaguya)
"Miraculous Continent Japan" (NHK Shinkai Project: Giant Deep Sea Creatures)
"Apple's Trajectory" (Miracle Apples)


Support Tracksounds:

Most of the  soundtracks mentioned in this episode can be found at Amazon.  Your purchases through these links help us to keep on keepin' on!  Thank You!

Buy Soundtracks at Amazon.com

Get Marius Masalar's "Cue The Orchestra" at Trackounds.Bandcamp.com




Thursday, February 20, 2014

2013 IFMCA Award Winners

2013 IFMCA Award Winners


INTERNATIONAL FILM MUSIC CRITICS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES WINNERS; COMPOSERS FROM POLAND, SPAIN, DOMINATE


FEBRUARY 20, 2014 — The International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) announces its list of winners for excellence in musical scoring in 2013. This year’s awards have a real international flavor, with the top awards going to composers primarily from Poland and Spain, but also from France, Japan and Argentina.

The award for Score of the Year goes to Polish composer ABEL KORZENIOWSKI for his beautiful score for director Carlo Carlei’s new cinematic version of the classic Shakespeare story of tragically doomed love, ROMEO AND JULIET. IFMCA member Christian Clemmensen called the score an “epic romance”, and felt that the film “inspired greatness out of the right composer”, while IFMCA member Jon Broxton said that Korzeniowski “is a composer who is not afraid to bring out the deeper sentiments in a film through his music, and it’s so refreshing to hear music from a man who so clearly understands what good film music can achieve”.

Korzeniowski was also named Composer of the Year, having not only scored Romeo and Juliet, but also the surreal fantasy ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW, which underscored the story of a man gradually losing his grip on reality while visiting a theme park with a soaring satire of traditional Disneyland music. The score for Romeo and Juliet was also named Best Score for a Drama Film. These are the second, third and fourth IFMCA awards for Korzeniowski, who previously won the Drama Score award for A SINGLE MAN IN 2009.

The IFMCA’s ongoing recognition of emerging talent in the film music world this year spotlights Bordeaux, France native LAURENT EYQUEM, who was named Breakthrough Composer of the Year. Having made his film music debut just five years ago in 2008, Eyquem impressed the IFMCA greatly with two spectacular scores in 2013: director Ronald Maxwell’s epic civil war drama COPPERHEAD, and a biopic of the great South African civil rights leader WINNIE MANDELA, starring Jennifer Hudson and Terrence Howard. Eyquem’s emotional orchestral music for these projects really struck a chord with the IFMCA membership.

Spanish composer ROQUE BAÑOS wrote the IFMCA’s Film Music Composition of the Year, and won the Best Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror score award for his astonishingly brutal, violent, brilliant orchestral music for the remake of the horror classic EVIL DEAD. Employing huge orchestral and choral forces, as well as the eerie tones of an air raid siren, Baños’s score is a wonderful example of the best in contemporary horror movie scoring, and the composition of the year – “Abominations Rising” – is a tour-de-force of power, intensity, and musical excellence. This is the first IFMCA Award win for Baños, who was previously nominated for his score TORRENTE 4: LETHAL CRISIS in 2011.

The various other genre awards were won by THEODORE SHAPIRO for director Ben Stiller’s globetrotting comedy-drama THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY; Spanish composer VÍCTOR REYES for the ingenious classical music thriller GRAND PIANO; Japanese composer JOE HISAISHI for his warm score for director Hayao Miyazaki’s anime film THE WIND RISES; and CONRAD POPE for his exquisite music for the artistic documentary TIM’S VERMEER.

In the non-film categories, Argentine composer FEDERICO JUSID won the award for Best Original Score for a Television Series for his outstanding work on the most recent season of the Spanish historical TV drama ISABEL, while French composer OLIVIER DERIVIÈRE won the award for Best Original Score for a Video Game or Interactive Media for his creative, unconventional score for the reality-altering REMEMBER ME.

La-La Land Records won the Best Archival Release of an Existing Score – Compilation award for their superb work on Michael Kamen, Eric Clapton and David Sanborn’s classic action scores in the LETHAL WEAPON series, released in a lavish 4-CD set by producers Neil S. Bulk and MV Gerhard. They also continued their monopoly of the Film Music Record Label of the Year category, winning for the fourth straight year, and solidifying their position at the top of the list of labels specializing in lovingly restoring the greatest film music of the past.

Finally, conductor Nic Raine and producers James Fitzpatrick and Luc Van de Ven won the Best Archival Release of an Existing Score – Re-Release or Re-Recording award for their outstanding re-recording of one of Jerry Goldsmith’s once-lost 1980s action scores, THE SALAMANDER. The IFMCA also chose to present a special award to Welsh composer and orchestrator LEIGH PHILLIPS, who worked with the label on The Salamander. With the original recordings lost and virtually no sheet music to work with, Phillips faithfully re-created the score by ear, watching the film over and over again in order to fully understand Goldsmith’s music. As a result of his diligence, technique and dedication – as well as the subsequent performance by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra - this long-desired work has finally been made available to collectors.

=============================================

THE WINNERS

FILM SCORE OF THE YEAR
• Romeo and Juliet, music by Abel Korzeniowski

FILM COMPOSER OF THE YEAR
• Abel Korzeniowski

BREAKTHROUGH FILM COMPOSER OF THE YEAR
• Laurent Eyquem

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DRAMA FILM
• Romeo and Juliet, music by Abel Korzeniowski

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A COMEDY FILM
• The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, music by Theodore Shapiro

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ACTION/ADVENTURE/THRILLER FILM
• Grand Piano, music by Víctor Reyes

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A FANTASY/SCIENCE FICTION/HORROR FILM
• Evil Dead, music by Roque Baños

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ANIMATED FEATURE
• The Wind Rises, music by Joe Hisaishi

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
• Tim's Vermeer, music by Conrad Pope

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A TELEVISION SERIES
• Isabel, music by Federico Jusid

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A VIDEO GAME OR INTERACTIVE MEDIA
• Remember Me, music by Olivier Deriviére

BEST ARCHIVAL RELEASE OF AN EXISTING SCORE - RE-RELEASE OR RE-RECORDING
• The Salamander, music by Jerry Goldsmith; re-recording conducted by Nic Raine; album produced by James Fitzpatrick; liner notes by Frank K. De Wald; album art direction by Paul de Blieck, Johan van den Broeck and GINKO DIGI (Prometheus/Tadlow)

BEST ARCHIVAL RELEASE OF AN EXISTING SCORE – COMPILATION
• Lethal Weapon Soundtrack Collection, music by Michael Kamen, Eric Clapton and David Sanborn; album produced by Neil S. Bulk and MV Gerhard; liner notes by Jeff Bond; album art direction by Jim Titus (La-La Land)

FILM MUSIC RECORD LABEL OF THE YEAR
• La-La Land Records, MV Gerhard and Matt Verboys

FILM MUSIC COMPOSITION OF THE YEAR
• “Abominations Rising” from Evil Dead, music by Roque Baños

SPECIAL AWARD
• The Salamander, score reconstruction by Leigh Phillips

=============================================

The International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) is an association of online, print and radio journalists who specialize in writing and broadcasting about original film, television and game music.

Since its inception, the IFMCA has grown to comprise over 60 members from countries as diverse as Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

Previous IFMCA Score of the Year Awards have been awarded to Mychael Danna’s LIFE OF PI in 2012, John Williams’ WAR HORSE in 2011, John Powell’s HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON in 2010, Michael Giacchino’s UP in 2009, Alexandre Desplat’s THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON in 2008, Dario Marianelli’s ATONEMENT in 2007, James Newton Howard’s LADY IN THE WATER in 2006, John Williams’ MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA in 2005 and Michael Giacchino’s THE INCREDIBLES in 2004.

For more information about the International Film Music Critics Association visit filmmusiccritics.org or facebook.com/ifmca, follow us at twitter.com/IFMCA, or contact us at press@filmmusiccritics.org.